Home » The Hecuba, Medea, PH Nissae, and Orestes, of Euripides: Literally Translated Into English from the Text of G. Dindorf, with Porsons Various Readings, to Which Are Added Critical Notes from the Best Commentators by Euripides
The Hecuba, Medea, PH Nissae, and Orestes, of Euripides: Literally Translated Into English from the Text of G. Dindorf, with Porsons Various Readings, to Which Are Added Critical Notes from the Best Commentators Euripides

The Hecuba, Medea, PH Nissae, and Orestes, of Euripides: Literally Translated Into English from the Text of G. Dindorf, with Porsons Various Readings, to Which Are Added Critical Notes from the Best Commentators

Euripides

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331834533
Paperback
272 pages
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Excerpt from The Hecuba, Medea, Ph nissae, and Orestes, of Euripides: Literally Translated Into English From the Text of G. Dindorf, With Porsons Various Readings, to Which Are Added Critical Notes From the Best CommentatorsAfter the taking ofMoreExcerpt from The Hecuba, Medea, Ph nissae, and Orestes, of Euripides: Literally Translated Into English From the Text of G. Dindorf, With Porsons Various Readings, to Which Are Added Critical Notes From the Best CommentatorsAfter the taking of Troy, the Greeks weighed anchor, and put in at the opposite Chersonese of Thrace, of which Polymestor was king, - the same place where they raised a cenotaph to Achilles, who had been buried at Troy- and having delayed there some few days, so as to arrange their affairs, when they were going to put to sea, the shade of Achilles, appearing over the tomb, withheld the Greeks from setting sail, demanding to be offered to him as a gift of honour, Polyxena, the daughter of Priam, who had before also been betrothed to him by her father- by reason of whom, too, Achilles was slain, being shot with an arrow by Paris and Deiphobus, when Priam was about to complete her vows of betrothal to him. The Greeks, then, remembering the good deeds they had experienced at his hands, and honouring his valour, passed a decree to sacrifice Polyxena over the tomb of the hero- and sent the son of Laertes to her mother Hecuba, that he might both take possession of the virgin, and by subtilty of speech (for such was the character of the man) might persuade Hecuba not to take to heart the loss of her daughter. Ulysses, accordingly, on his arrival, found the damsel taking part with him in his purpose, and persuading her mother that it was more fitting for her to die than to live unbecoming her rank.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.